These 5 Health Crazes Are On Everyone’s Minds Right Now, But Are They Worth It?

Grace Stafford
August 14, 2019

These 5 Health Crazes Are On Everyone’s Minds Right Now, But Are They Worth It?

Grace Stafford
August 14, 2019

These 5 Health Crazes Are On Everyone’s Minds Right Now, But Are They Worth It?

Every time you sign into Instagram or Pinterest, it seems that there’s another trend that someone swears by to lose weight, improve their health, reduce pain, you name it. Health and wellness fads have been around forever, with many modern examples hearkening to ancient practices. Though it’s hard to know which trends will work for you, it’s important to research any changes to your diet or wellbeing that you would be making to ensure their safety; an endorsement from the hottest new celebrity should never be your only reference. 

There’s nothing wrong with wanting to improve upon your health and wellbeing, it’s simply important to know what’s best for your body and not to get wrapped up in the potentially dangerous crazes. What might be safe for some, might not be for others. Always consult your doctor first.

 

Celery juicing

Over the last few months, Instagram has been full of influencers showing off their bright green juices on the daily, which doesn’t feel too far from the normal spinach-packed smoothie or juice. But lately, that glass has only been full of celery. Juicing and juice cleanse have been common for years but have reduced recently as fruit juices contain a lot more sugar than people realize, as well as the loss of natural fibers in fruits and vegetables when you liquefy them. Celery, though, doesn’t contain high levels of fructose like fruit, so it’s fine to consume larger amounts of it. Health professionals agree that there’s no real harm in celery juicing, but it doesn’t have any magical weight loss or skin-clearing benefits that you wouldn’t find by simply eating large amounts of vegetables. 

 

Non-dairy milks

With the rise in popularity and accessibility of vegan diets and increased consciousness of environmental impacts of dairy production, non-dairy milk options have been all over grocery store fridges and coffee shop menus. Whether you’re lactose-intolerant, vegan, or concerned about the sourcing of milk, the influx of alternative milk makes it significantly easier to adjust your diet. The options seem endless now – soy, almond, coconut, rice, cashew, macadamia, hemp, quinoa, and oat are among the most common ones. Oat milk has quickly become the favorite for baristas and everyday use in cooking and on its own, thanks to its similarity in texture and taste to traditional dairy milk. This Healthline article summarizes the nutrients and benefits of the different options so that you can make an informed decision about which non-dairy alternative is right for you. 

 

CBD products

It feels like just overnight that gas stations and head shops started offering CBD (cannabidiol) infused lotions, lip balms, candy, and oils, and just a blink of the eye since coffee shops began offering CBD coffee. While CBD does not “get you high” in the same way as the chemical THC in federally illegal marijuana, its usage has been praised for its restorative health powers from pain to seizures. Both CBD and THC can be found in the same hemp plant, it is simply a matter of if the plant becomes pollinated, allowing it to become marijuana and produce THC. This line is quite easy to cross, and thus the production of hemp is still a heavily regulated process, which makes the legality of CBD hard to pinpoint. The effects of CBD are also hard to pinpoint as there have not been many scientific studies performed, so it is advised that you exercise caution when trying the new trend. If you’re curious about the legality and science behind CBD, this article from PBS’s science writers could help.

 

Intermittent Fasting

In the recent declines of true dieting, more people have been turning to Intermittent Fasting, which is instead a pattern that alternates between fasting and eating. The pattern focuses not on what you can and cannot eat like traditional diets but instead on when you should eat. The most common method is the 16/8 method, which involves eating within an eight-hour window and fasting for 16 hours. People praise intermittent fasting for weight loss, reduction of insulin, and improved digestive processes. Intermittent fasting generally gets good reports from scientific studies, though most have only been reported on animals; it’s important to treat this new eating pattern with caution and consult a doctor before starting. For those who have issues with fertility or have previous experiences with eating disorders, intermittent fasting should be avoided.

 

Detox Teas 

Detox teas, slimming teas, or fit teas, whatever name they are going by at the moment, have been promoted since the beginning of Instagram by influencers and celebrities. You’ve likely seen the Kardashians, Cardi B, or countless others holding these supposed magic drinks in their posts and stories. The most popular brand recently is Flat Tummy Tea, which claims to reduce bloating, drop water weight, and remove toxins when consumed. While some people do report good results from its consumption, others claim it has laxative effects with non-lasting slimming results. Other celebrities like actress and activist Jameela Jamil have taken to criticizing people who promote the teas and urge others to avoid the products. If you’re looking for a quick way to drop water weight for the day or reset your digestive tract, then save some money and buy a detox tea off the shelf in your grocery store from a more familiar brand.

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